Sweater #135


While the top sweater is experiencing culture shock of being exhibited in a gallery in a more formal art setting, the sweater below was placed on a bicycle rack on the corner of two main streets of Spartanburg, SC late last week.  And, since I didn’t want to promote one specific business, I found that this seemed to be a great compromise by placing it in front of a what seemed to be a popular eatery but also a placement promoting alternative transportation options. The pattern used for this sweater is one that is new to me and reminded me of ancient Peruvian textiles. The language of textiles are as universal as one can get in the sense that we all have some connection to a shape of a textile, its use or the images imbedded into them.  I am hopeful that this little sweater spoke to someone out there to pick it up and investigate its meaning.

2 Comments

Filed under Found Objects, Knitting, Textiles

2 responses to “Sweater #135

  1. My wife knits small sweaters and sets them in places to be found by others that
    she hopes will donate money to your cause. The question I have is: how do you know if people are donating? When a person is directed to the website, how do you know if they got to the website from your tag on the sweaters? And how much has been donated?
    Please advise,
    Gary

    • Hi Gary,
      It is impossible to directly correlate the on-line giving with the work that knitters are doing with ARTivention unless specifically stated in the comment box when a donation has been made. However, in the past, I have received word from National Coalition for the Homeless that on-line giving had unexpectedly increased. I am awaiting an update from NCH to see if direct connections from on-line giving and this project within the last couple of months have occurred. While direct correlation of collected sweaters and increased giving may not necessarily be determined, I believe this project still promotes the awareness of this issue, the great organization of NCH, and the possibilities of the interactions of art and the collectors. Thanks for the important question!

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